Posted in book reviews

Good Girl, Bad Blood – Holly Jackson (A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder, #2)

Pip Fitz-Amobi is not a detective anymore.

With the help of Ravi Singh, she released a true-crime podcast about the murder case they solved together last year. The podcast has gone viral, yet Pip insists her investigating days are behind her.

But she will have to break that promise when someone she knows goes missing. Jamie Reynolds has disappeared but the police won’t do anything about it. And if they won’t look for Jamie then Pip will, uncovering more of her town’s dark secrets along the way… and this time EVERYONE is listening. But will she find him before it’s too late?

DISCLAIMER: Mild spoilers for the first novel and for this one. Read at your own discretion!

TW: rape, assault, blood, murder, abuse

Good Girl, Bad Blood is the sequel to Jackson’s 2019 debut novel, A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder. Following on from the first novel, we find Pip dealing with the consequences and trauma from the events of the first novel. The events of book one haunt Pip, causing her to question her identity (who is she? Is she a good person?) and the things she did in book 1 that led her to revealing the truth about what happened to Andie Bell…

And you feel this. You feel how haunted Pip is, in the opening lines of most chapters. They open with Pip being haunted by memories, by sounds, by images; you feel how lost Pip is, how confused, how sad. For example:

“Words spliced, growing across the gaps like vines as her eyes unfocused, until her handwriting was just one writhing blur. Pip was looking at the page, but she wasn’t really there. It was like that now; giant holes in her attention that she slipped right into.”

You see the impact past (and recent) events have had on Pip and her mental health, written in a nuanced, and complex way. They were built in to the story, and it made Pip feel like a real, tangible character. That is why I loved the opening lines of the chapters so much, because they drew your attention and focus back down to the character, and her raw, honest emotions – before launching back in to the drama. It worked really, really well.

This novel also continued to explore the impact of the first novel in other ways, such as the court trials for certain offenders. This acts as a different plot point, that slowly becomes more and more entwined in to the current investigation…

And while it does that, it also opens up a discourse and a sub-plot on rape culture and justice, the latter which is a pre-dominant over-arching theme for both novels.

What is justice? Who can determine it? This novel points out that the law, our government systems (the court, the police), do not always get it right – but does that mean that personal vendettas and vigilantism can be carried out? It is an interesting discourse, questioning whether if there is, or should be, a simple black and white view on things…

And again, this leads Pip to question her own integrity, her own morals, and what is truth. People question her, think she’s a liar, and detest her for what she did to discover the truth about Andie, and the way she presented the facts afterwards. It is a study in justice and character.

So, this novel was able to wonderfully blend the events and consequences of the first novel in to this sequel, while also allowing the sequel to stand alone as it’s own thrilling and entertaining investigative drama. I loved the fact this acted as a direct continuation, while also setting up new stories – I really applaud Jackson for blending and balancing the two well.

But my absolute favourite thing about these novels are the characters and their relationships. I find it really nice and refreshing to read about such a genuine loving, honest and healthy relationship between Pip and Ravi. And I love Pip’s relationships with her friends: Cara, Connor and Zach. Even when things aren’t always perfect, we see them all communicate and work through their issues, and come out on the other side having learnt and growing as people and friends because of it.

Other things I liked about this novel! The podcast format. I loved how that was a way to recap the other plot points. I really liked that we got to see comments, and the theories – this felt even more interactive. (And again, the discussion on whether things like this should even be a podcast. The question is can you get these stories out there, without profiting off of the trauma? and things like that. A very nuanced, complex novel).

I’m really excited to see where Jackson is going to take this series. The way this novel ended had me in chills. It ended angrily, and with a sense of vengeance, and with Pip in a dark place (she seems to be dealing with PTSD, which is likely after the final events of what happened to her) and I am excited to see Jackson explore that further. It was lightly touched on in this novel (identity crisis, her screaming, getting expelled), but things have only gotten bigger..

I haven’t wanted to spoil too much, but yes. The way this novel ended….chills. We had Pip dealing with her darker side, with her trauma, her obsessive habits, but the novel did not end with her solving them…

5/5 Stars!

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